Neurological assessment and six-month follow-up for patients treated with induced hypothermia after cardiac arrest

Background

The outcome after cardiac arrest is still relatively poor. However, induced mild hypothermia can improve survival and the neurological outcome. During induced hypothermia, the body temperature is reduced to 32-34˚C for 12-24 h. Reliable methods for the assessment of prognosis after cardiac arrest is inadequate or incomplete investigated since the treatment was introduced.

For survivors after cardiac arrest quality of life is important. Furthermore, it is also important to acknowledge the relatives and their experience.

The aim of this study is to observe patients during the first six month after cardiac arrest treated with induced hypothermia to investigate quality of life, physical and psychical function, neurological function and mortality. This is related to the initial levels of biochemical markers, findings of EEG, neurological investigation, Sensory Evoked Potential (SEP) and Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

The aim is also to compare quality of life and function over time and relationship between quality of life and function. Another aim is to describe the relatives experience when someone they care for survived a cardiac arrest and how the incident has affected their daily life.

Publications

Larsson IM, Wallin E, Rubertsson S. Cold saline infusion and ice packs alone are effective in inducing and maintaining therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Resuscitation 2010; 81: 15-19.

Members of the group

PhD-students
Ing-Marie Larsson, RN, Dept. of Surgical Sciences/Anaesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University Hospital

Ewa Wallin, RN, Dept. of Surgical Sciences/Anaesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University Hospital

Marie Sellert-Rydberg, RN, Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Falun

Principal investigator
Sten Rubertsson, MD, PhD, EDIC, FCCM, Professor, Dept. of Surgical Sciences/Anaesthesiology & Intensive Care, Uppsala University Hospital

Post-doc (PhD)
Marja-Leena Kristofferzon, RN, FD, Dept. of Health and Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle

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